Rich Or Poor?

Posted by & filed under Canadian Economy, Canadian Government.

Description: November was a bad month for Canadian employment with Canada losing over 70,000 jobs, while our neighbour to the south added over a quarter million. For Canada, this was our worst result in ten years. Financial Post Columnist Jack Mintz offers “that propping up consumer demand by running deficits and distributive tax policies is… Read more »

Deficit still there

Posted by & filed under Canadian Economy, Canadian Government.

Description:    This past week our federal government introduced its budget for the next fiscal year. There were some interesting initiatives, including a possible grant to first-time home-owners from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and some early steps towards a national pharmacare program. But what wasn’t there is also quite interesting: the government is… Read more »

Keep learning: Government might help

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government.

Description:    March 19 is budget day in Canada, and, of course, there’s speculation out there on what measures the budget will include. One thing being discussed is what has been called a life-long learning account. Supposedly the account will receive a top-up from the federal government, something like the RESPs parents create for children…. Read more »

The other side of the story

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government, Data security, Personal Tax.

Description: Last week this space featured a discussion of a request by Statistics Canada to obtain banking information of Canadians without having approached those Canadians first. Of course, the opposition parties in Parliament were quick to criticize this apparent breach of protocol, though Statistics Canada had made efforts to brief the press beforehand. This week… Read more »

Costing Calgary 2.0

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government.

Description:  It all comes down to the numbers. Supporters of Calgary’s bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics are quoting optimistic figures showing that $5 billion plus in costs for the Games will produce 5 times the benefits in economic impacts. On the other side are skeptics claiming the games will leave the three levels of… Read more »

Outlook Negative

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government.

Description: It can’t be good news any time a bond-rating agency downgrades your outlook from “stable” to “negative.” But that is exactly what happened this past week as the Dominion Bond Rating Service (DBRS) provided its opinion on the current state of the Province of New Brunswick’s financial situation. With an aging population requiring health… Read more »

Searching for golden parachutes

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government.

Description: It has taken about eight years – including an attempt earlier this past summer – but New Brunswickers finally know that their provincially owned electrical utility paid roughly $1.7 million in severance to David Hay, the organization’s former CEO. In 2010 Hay abstained from a vote by the board of NB Power to sell… Read more »

Why not millennials?

Posted by & filed under Accounting Careers, Canadian Government.

Description: It’s a bit of a mystery. The average age of new permanent employees joining the public service is 37. That seems a bit long in the tooth, don’t you think? This is causing some to conclude that millenials are avoiding the public service of Canada. This does not bode well for the level of… Read more »

Costing election promises

Posted by & filed under Auditing, Canadian Government, Cost Accounting.

Description: Critics and citizens alike have long decried the lofty election promises politicians make during election campaigns. But now the Liberal government of the tiny Canadian province of New Brunswick appears to be trying to change this dynamic by proposing a law requiring political parties to cost their election platforms. Violators would be punished by… Read more »

A budget for science?

Posted by & filed under Canadian Government, Student life.

Description: This week’s federal budget had a number of interesting measures, and one that seems to be very strategic is the announcement of close to $118 million in funding for 25 research chairs in an effort to recruit “top-tier international scholars.” Following the U.S. election and the earlier Brexit vote in Britain, the promise of… Read more »